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Carry The Kettle First Nation

“Carry the Kettle” First Nation/Reserve signed Treaty 4 at Fort Walsh in 1877. As of 2014, Carry the Kettle First Nation has their Cypress Hills Land Claim in federal court.

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The ancestors of the modern “Carry the Kettle” First Nation/Reserve signed adhesion to Treaty 4 at Fort Walsh on September 25, 1877. The three Assiniboine chiefs who signed the treaty 4 adhesion were Man Who Takes The Coat (Cuwiknaga Je Eyaku, in the Assiniboine/Nakoda language), Long Lodge (Teepee Hoksa), and Lean Man (Wica Hostaka).
Historically, First Nations bands/chiefs signed treaty in their tradational territories/homelands. One might allude to the fact that if Carry the Kettle was in their current traditional homelands/territory (south of Sintaluta, SK), they would have been present at the initial signing of treaty 4 in Fort Qu’Appelle in 1874. Or any of the other subsequent adhesions of 1875 and 1876 in the area of the prairies in treaty 4 or what is now known as southern Saskatchewan. As of 2014, Carry the Kettle First Nation has their Cypress Hills Land Claim in federal court.

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