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Gameti First Nation

The Gameti First Nation is a Tłı̨chǫ First Nations band government in the Northwest Territories midway between Great Slave Lake and Great Bear Lake

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The Gameti First Nation is a Tłı̨chǫ First Nations band government in the Northwest Territories. In 2005, Gameti became part of the Tłı̨chǫ Government, and collectively holds title to 39,000 square kilometers of Tłı̨chǫ land. The band’s main community is Gamètì, where 319 of its 366 members live.

The community of Gamètì (formerly known as Rae Lakes) is in the Northwest Territories, midway along the chain of waterways connecting Great Slave Lake to Great Bear Lake. The name was officially changed to Gamètì under the Tłı̨chǫ Agreement in 2005.

Situated on a long arm extending into Rae Lake in a traditional hunting area of the Tłı̨chǫ and Sahtu dene peoples. Although the site was long used as a temporary camp, in the 1970s an airstrip, school, store and new log houses were built, and families settled here.

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