What
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Where
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K’ómoks First Nation

For thousands of years indigenous people occupied the shoreline of eastern Vancouver Island in a place referred to as “the land of plenty”. This Land of Plenty stretched from what is known today as Kelsey Bay in the north, down to Hornby and Denman Island in the south, and included the watershed and estuary of the Puntledge River. The people called K’ómoks today referred to themselves as Sahtloot, Sasitla, Ieeksun and Puntledge.

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For thousands of years indigenous people occupied the shoreline of eastern Vancouver Island in a place referred to as “the land of plenty”. This Land of Plenty stretched from what is known today as Kelsey Bay in the north, down to Hornby and Denman Island in the south, and included the watershed and estuary of the Puntledge River. The people called K’ómoks today referred to themselves as Sahtloot, Sasitla, Ieeksun and Puntledge.

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