What
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Where
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La Nation Innu Matimekush-Lac John First Nation

Matimekush (which means “little trout”) is located on the shores of Lake Pearce, about 510 km north of Sept-Îles, Quebec. The region was actively explored for minerals in the 1960s and in 1998, 131 acres of land was set aside for the use of the Schefferville Innu band.

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The community of Matimekush, which means “little trout”, is located on the shores of Lake Pearce, about 510 km north of Sept-Îles. The community of Lake John was transferred from the provincial to the federal government in 1960, during the golden age of neighbouring iron ore mining exploitation. In 1968, Quebec also transferred what is now the Matimekush reserve to Canada. In May 1998, the Governor in Council granted a decree that set aside 131 acres of land for the use of the Schefferville Innu band.

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