What
image
  • imageAccommodations
  • imageAir Travel
  • imageAirport Parking
  • imageAttractions
  • imageAutomotive
  • imageBed & Breakfasts
  • imageBoat Rentals or Charters
  • imageBuses or Shuttles
  • imageCafe
  • imageCampgrounds
  • imageCasinos
  • imageCinema
  • imageCraft Beer - Winery
  • imageCurrency Exchange
  • imageEmergency
  • imageEntertainment
  • imageFarmers Market
  • imageFestivals
  • imageFire Hall
  • imageFirst Nation
  • imageFlea market
  • imageFree
  • imageGolf Course
  • imageGovernment
  • imageHistorical
  • imageHospital
  • imageHostel
  • imageHotels
  • imageKids Amusement
  • imageLimousines
  • imageLong Term Rental
  • imageMarijuana /CBD
  • imageMarinas
  • imageMuseum / Gallery
  • imagePark
  • imagePolice
  • imagePublic Transit
  • imageRental Car
  • imageRestaurant
  • imageRV Rental
  • imageShopping
  • imageShopping District
  • imageShopping mall
  • imageSki Resort
  • imageSpa
  • imageSports & Recreation
  • imageSports Team
  • imageTaxi
  • imageTheatre
  • imageTour
  • imageTourist Services
  • imageTours & Tour Guides
  • imageTrain
  • imageTransit Hub
  • imageTransportation
  • imageTravel
  • imageTravel Info/Office
  • imageVacation Rental
  • imageWilderness Lodge
Where
image
image

Lake Babine Nation

Lake Babine Nation has Hereditary Chiefs and four clans (Bear, Caribou, Beaver and Frog) who enjoyed a vibrant inland fishery, which was closed byt eh BC government in In 1905. In 1957, the communities of Fort Babine and Old Fort were amalgamated and the Lake Babine people were moved from the Lake to the Woyenne Reserve in Burns Lake.

Be the first to review

Lake Babine Nation traditionally utilized a governing structure called the ‘Bah’lats”. Within the Bah’lats there were Hereditary Chiefs and four clans (Bear, Caribou, Beaver and Frog) who enjoyed a vibrant economy based of inland fishery.
Early 1900’s – Indian Affairs Agent started distributing provisions in Old Hazelton
In 1905 the Department of Fisheries and the Commercial fisheries of BC closed the fish weirs, which were the major food source for the community.
1957 – The communities of Fort Babine and Old Fort were amalgamated in order to cut down on travels for the Indian Agent.
1967 – Completion of the forced move of Lake Babine people from the Lake to the Woyenne Reserve in Burns Lake.

image