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Nation Anishnabe du Lac Simon

The Algonquin Nation occupied a wide area extending from the “Trois-Rivières” region to Hudson Bay and west to the Great Lakes. Each tribe had its own identity; however, they all identified themselves as members of the Anishinabeg family, but were decimated by diseases brought by Europeans and wars against the Iroquois and Mohawks due to the fur trade.

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Before the arrival of Europeans
At the arrival of the first Europeans, the Algonquin Nation occupied a wide area extending from the “Trois-Rivières” region to Hudson Bay to the west near the Great Lakes. Each tribe had its own identity; however, they all identified themselves as members of the Anishinabeg family. Writings by Champlain in 1613 and religious groups who followed mention some of the communities that formed this great nation. Unfortunately many were decimated by diseases brought by Europeans and wars against the Iroquois and Mohawks due to the fur trade.

In roughly 50 years between 1640 and the end of the century, thousands died and those who survived owed their survival to their great ability to disappear into the most remote forests and dangerous rivers. Below some of these groups are described by early explorers.

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