What
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Where
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Samahquam First Nation

The St'át'imc original territory extended east to the Big Slide; south to the island on Harrison Lake and west of the Fraser River to the headwaters of the Lillooet River, Ryan River and Black Tusk.

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The St’át’imc are the original inhabitants of the territory which extends north to Churn Creek and to South French Bar; northwest to the headwaters of the Bridge River; north and east toward Hat Creek Valley; east to the Big Slide; south to the island on Harrison Lake and west of the Fraser River to the headwaters of the Lillooet River, Ryan River and Black Tusk.

The St’át’imc Nation is composed of eleven distinct and self-governing communities, including the Líl’wat Nation, which is a distinct Nation with linguistic, cultural, familial and political ties to the St’át’imc Nation.

In 1998 a St’át’imc Chiefs Council was formed so that the communities could work collectively to advocate on various political topics including title and rights issues. The six northern St’át’imc communities (Sekw’el’was, T’ít’q’et, Tsal’alh, Ts’kw’aylaxw, Xaxli’p, and Xwísten) are also served by the Lillooet Tribal Council, and the five southern Stl’alt’imx communities (Líl’wat, N’Quatqua, Samahquam, Skatin, Xa’xtsa) are also served by the Lower Stl’atl’imx Tribal Council.

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