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Sweetgrass First Nation

Sweetgrass First Nation signed Treaty 6 at Fort Carlton in 1876, and a reserve was surveyed 26 kms west of North Battleford in 1884 for the melded band members, who sold hay & wood and maintained gardens & livestock.

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History of Sweetgrass First Nation
Chief Sweetgrass (Weekaskookwasayin) signed Treaty 6 on September 9, 1876, with the Fort Pitt Indians but was killed about six months later. He was succeeded by his son, Apseenes (Young Sweet Grass). He was unable to hold the band together, which began to splinter. In 1882, Young Sweet Grass & seventeen followers joined Wah-wee-kah-oo-tah-mah-hote (Strikes him on the back), who had signed Treaty 6 at Fort Carlton on August 28, 1876. Wah-wee-kah-oo-tah-mah-hote was chief from 1876 to 1883: but he was deposed in 1884 and Young Sweet Grass became chief.

A reserve was surveyed west of Battleford in 1884 for the melded band members, who sold hay & wood and maintained gardens & livestock.

Currently the band controls 20,573.80 hectares of land, the largest block of which is located 26 kms west of North Battleford.

There are 2051 registered band members (as of Dec. 31/2019), 749 people live on reserve which includes non-first nation people as well as people from other first nations.

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