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Weenusk (Peawanuck) First Nation

Weenusk First Nation is a Cree First Nation band government in northern Ontario, near the shores of Hudson Bay.

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Weenusk First Nation is a Cree First Nation band government in northern Ontario, near the shores of Hudson Bay. In September, 2007, its total registered population was 516. Weenusk First Nation was an independent member of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) but now have joined the Mushkegowuk Council, a regional tribal council, who is also a member of NAN.

Weenusk First Nation’s reserve is the 5310 ha Winisk Indian Reserve 90. Associated with the reserve is their Winisk Indian Settlement also known as Peawanuck, which also holds reserve status. Originally, the Weenusk First Nation was located within their reserve, but they were forced to move 30 km (19 mi) southwest to Peawanuck when on May 16, 1986, spring floods swept away much of the original settlement, which had been located 6 km (4 mi) upriver from Hudson Bay.

Being that the community is composed of Cree, Oji-cree, Ojibwa and Métis peoples, in addition to Cree, Anishininiimowin and Ojibwemowin are also spoken there.

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