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Main Trans-Canada Route #1 / #17

What to See & Do in on the Main Canada-Canada Route?

The Main Route of the Trans-Canada goes from Victoria on Vancouver Island, through the scenic Rockies, across the wide open Prairies, and then cuts across Ontario’s rugged Canadian Shield before hitting the St Lawrence and Atlantic Lowlands.  from there it side-tracks across the red sandy soils of PEI, the northern extremes of the Appalachians in Cape Breton, and then again after a ferry ride crosses the rugged wilds of the Island of Newfoundland.

Trans-Canada Highway Main Route (mostly) #1 #17

 

The main Trans-Canada between Victoria British Columbia and St John’s Newfoundland follows the #1 highway in the British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, #17/417 in Ontario and the AutoRoutes #20 and #85 in Quebec, and #2 in New Brunswick, #104 and #105 through Nova Scotia, the #1 on the worthy side-trip through Prince Edward Island, and follows the #1 route through Newfoundland.

Notably the Trans-Canada DOES NOT follow a route through Toronto, despite many local’s claims to that effect. Highway 401, known as the “Macdonald Cartier Freeway” does not form part of the Trans-Canada at ANY SEGMENT of its  828 kilometres (514 mi) between Windsor in the west to the Ontario–Quebec border in the east. We include it on this website as part of a Toronto Detour.

NOTE:

For full details of this route, see our Itineraries page